Category Archives: Culture & History

Look for ghosts in Dayton Lane, October 17

Join the Dayton Lane Historic District for the Twelfth Annual Ghost Walk, Saturday, October 17, to explore the area in search of spirits (dead ones, that is).

Here is your chance to feel the presence of those who walked this earth before us, and hear the ghost tales from several of the “live” residents of these homes.

Take a lantern-led evening stroll through one of Hamilton, Ohio’s oldest neighborhoods and discover our ghosts, ghouls and legends.

At the end of this hour-long guided walk, there will be a reception at one of the homes.

Tours begin at 7:00 PM, 8:00 PM & 9:00 PM. Click here to  purchase.

Tours leave the Wolf Gazebo in the 900 block of Campbell Avenue.   Walk goes on rain or moonshine.  Wear comfortable walking shoes and dress appropriately for the weather.  We don’t want you to confuse the goose bumps on your arms with being too cold!

Admission: Tickets are available on a first come-first serve basis below via PayPal. Advance tickets are $15.00 if purchased before 5pm on Friday, October 16th. Tickets will also be available the night of the walk for $20.00.  Those without advance tickets will be accommodated as space allows. Cash or check (made payable to Dayton Lane Historic Area) only the night of the walk. Please bring your ID if tickets are purchased via PayPal as your name will be on a will-call list.

* A Spiritual Consultant may also be available the night of the Tour to do readings for an extra fee.

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Historical wedding dresses subject of exhibition and lecture

Dr. Sara Butler, Miami University Art Department Professor Emeritus, will present “Reality and Fantasy: 150 Years of Butler County Weddings” at 7:00 pm on September 10 in the Emma Ritchie Auditorium at the Butler County Historical Society, 327 North Second Street, Hamilton.

The program is free to the public and highlights many of the wedding dresses worn by members of prominent area families including the Woods, Becketts, Fittons, Flenners, Griesmers, and Neilans.  A reception will follow the talk.

Butler created her presentation as a special program based on the exhibit she and her intern Marcus Gray developed for the society.  The exhibit, which runs through December 31, shows how brides, grooms and their families celebrated their nuptial days for over 150 years.  It features 18 wedding dresses including bridal veils as well as the attire for members of their wedding party including the groom, maid-of-honor and flower girl.

The highlight of Butler’s talk is the dress and veil first worn by Mary Woods when she married Cyrus Falconer on October 8, 1839.  “Family records indicate that this particular dress was worn by at least three brides and the veil used by eight brides between 1839 and 1990,” she said.  “I greatly enjoyed learning about all of the families and telling the stories of the brides who wore the dresses.”

The Butler County Historical Society, located at 327 North Second Street, Hamilton, is a private non-profit formed in 1934 to preserve and interpret the county’s rich heritage.  It owns and operates the Benninghofen House, a high-Italian style home built in 1863 that is filled with the furnishings of a wealthy family during the Victorian Era.  The society is open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.  Group tours of the Benninghofen House Museum can be arranged by calling 896-9930.

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The Butler County Historical Society exhibits more than 150 years of fashion tied to the weddings of local families.  “Reality and Fantasy: 150 Years of Butler County Weddings” will showcase 18 wedding dresses, along with veils, tuxedos and other accoutrements.

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Many of the dresses were worn by members of well known and prominent families including the Woods, Becketts, Fittons, Flenners, Neilan and Griesmers.  Also featured are wedding photographs and written records showing how brides, grooms and their families celebrated their nuptial days.

The highlight of the exhibit is the dress and veil first worn by Mary Woods when she married Cyrus Falconer on October 8, 1839.  The dress was worn by at least three brides and the veil used by eight brides between 1839 and 1990.

The exhibit was developed by Sara Butler, Miami University Art Department Professor Emeritus, and her intern Marcus Gray, now a Miami graduate.

“This exhibit was a real treat for us,” she said.  “My research interests have been on dress and human behavior, especially historical dress during the 19th and early 20th centuries.  So I greatly enjoyed learning about all of the families and telling the stories of the brides who wore the dresses.”

Kathy Creighton, executive director of the historical society, said they also made some exciting discoveries in the process.

“Sara and I were thrilled to be able to locate and reunite the original veil with the wedding dress worn by Mary Woods in 1839 after they had been separated for more than 50 years,” Creighton said. “We have to thank Marjorie Beckett Belew who wore the dress and veil at her wedding in 1953 for making that possible.”

Dr. Sara Butler and Marcus Gray will give a special presentation of “Reality and Fantasy: 150 Years of Butler County Weddings,” 7 p.m. September 10, in the Emma Ritchie Auditorium.  A reception will follow the talk.

The wedding dress exhibit is located throughout the Benninghofen House and lower Emma Ritchie exhibit area and will run through December 31.

Interested visitors can also view the ongoing Beckett Paper Company exhibit located in the Emma Ritchie Auditorium and the enclosed porch of the Benninghofen House.  The Beckett Paper exhibit which runs through November 28 was developed by Dave Belew, former company president and husband of Marjorie Beckett who wore the 1839 dress during their wedding in 1953.

Both exhibits are free.

The exhibits are in the Butler County Historical Society, 327 North 2nd Street, Hamilton, and are open to the public Tuesday through Friday from 9:00 am to 4:00 pm and Saturdays from 9:00 am to 2:00 pm.

Group tours of either exhibit or the Benninghofen House Museum can be arranged by calling 513-896-9930.

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Yarn Bombers to spread joy at the Fitton Center

The BombShells of Cincinnati are an anonymous group of yarn bombers who strive to bring together the community through public works of fiber art.  They will be joining us on Wednesday, May 13, 2015 at 11:30 a.m. in the Carruthers Signature Ballroom at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts to share their story.

Since the summer of 2011, they have exploded onto the Cincinnati Art scene and become media darlings due to their large scale projects, such as the Central Parkway Bombing “The Big Bomb” and antics as performers. They spread warmth, joy and friendship everywhere they go while creating amazing fetes de arte!

This presentation is part of the Celebrating Self Luncheon Series. Celebrating Self is a casual and informative luncheon series featuring regional speakers, interesting topics and delicious food served by a variety of caterers. The Carruthers Signature Ballroom opens at 11:30 a.m. with a buffet lunch and musical entertainment by Treva Boardman.

Celebrating Self is presented by Ohio Magazine and the Celebrating Self Dessert Sponsor is Hillandale Family of Communities.

The cost is $15 for members and $20 for non-members.  For tickets please call 513-863-8873 ext. 110 or visit our website, www.fittoncenter.org.

Lost Boy Survivor Bol Aweng Speaks at MUH April 20

Miami University’s regional campuses will host a discussion titled Finding Your Ground: Art and the Refugee Experience with Bol Aweng, a survivor of the Lost Boys from South Sudan, on April 20 at 1 p.m.in Room 316 of Miami Hamilton’s Mosler Hall.

He will then speak at 4 p.m. in Room 136/137 of Miami Middletown’s Johnston Hall.

In 1987 with other Lost Boys, Aweng survived a 1,500-mile journey on foot to Ethiopia and Kenya. While in a refugee camp he developed art skills by creating from memory and imagination, using what material was available in the camp. In 2001 he came to America as a refugee, and graduated from Ohio State University in 2009 with a degree in Fine Art.

On April 20, Miami Middletown will host a fundraiser supporting the Buckeye Clinic in South Sudan titled A Journey of Hope: The Art of Bol Aweng at 5:30 p.m. in Johnston Hall. The Buckeye Clinic focuses on prenatal care, safe childbirth, and vaccinations for potentially deadly diseases such as measles and polio. Examples of Aweng’s art are available online at bolaweng.com.

http://bolaweng.com

For more information, call Dr. John Schaefer at 513.727.3204 or email schaefjp@miamioh.edu. Miami University Hamilton is located at 1601 University Boulevard, and Miami Middletown 4200 N. University Boulevard.

Eric C. Broyles to Discuss Book at Miami Hamilton on April 8

Miami University Hamilton will host a discussion with Eric C. Broyles on his book Encounters with Police: A Black Man’s Guide to Survival from 5:30 p.m. – 7:30 p.m. on Wednesday, April 8 in the Harry T. Wilks Conference Center.

Broyles is a Washington, DC based attorney, entrepreneur and author originally from Hamilton. He has been on both sides of the law as a juvenile delinquent and as a lawyer at a large prestigious law firm, at AOL, Inc. and AOL Time Warner, Inc. He was also a judicial law clerk on the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit. Broyles is a graduate of the University of Virginia School of Law where he served as Business Editor of the Virginia Journal of Law & Politics and is a summa cum laude graduate of the University of Cincinnati where he double majored in Marketing and Management.

Encounters with Police was co-authored with Adrian O. Jackson, a 25 year veteran of an Ohio police department. This book gives advice to African American boys and men on how to think about interaction with police to lower the chances of escalation. Encounters with Police also provides information on legal and administrative rights citizens have to redress police misconduct so no hostilities occur at the time of encounter.

The first 100 Miami students will receive a free book on production of Student ID. Light refreshments will be provided. This event is free and open to the public.

For more information, call Miami University’s Regional Offices of Diversity & Multicultural Services at 513.785.3024 or email kinggm@miamioh.edu. Miami University Hamilton is located at 1601 University Blvd.

 

Murder is on the Menu at Colonial Dinner Series

Join True Crime Historian Richard O Jones as the speaker for the Colonial Dinner Series, April 1.

The topic will be “Hamilton’s Last Execution,” the story of how George Schneider tried to get away with murder. He will also discuss the city’s earlier executions, including three soldiers at Fort Hamilton.

Dinner is $15. RSVP to 856-8600 by March 27.

Here’s the video from Jones’s first appearance at the Colonial Dinner Series, Sepetember 2013.

MUH prestents ‘Lakota Treaties: Living Promises’

Miami University Hamilton will host a presentation by Royal Yellow Hawk entitled Lakota Treaties: Living Promises from 4:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 17 in the Harry T. Wilks Conference Center.

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Hawk is a traditional and pow wow singer from the HeDog community on the Rosebud Reservation. Currently, he works for the Rosebud Sioux Tribe as the Executive Director of the Sicangu Treaty Office, providing leadership and support to the Sicangu Treaty Council. Hawk is very active in his community, serving as the Chairman of the Board of Directors for the Sicangu Owayawa Oti, the dormitory for Indian students attending local schools on the Rosebud Reservation.

Previously, he served on the Rosebud Sioux Tribal Council, as a representative for the HeDog community and has been a cultural consultant for various tribal programs. Hawk interned with Albert White Hat Sr. for several years through Sinte Gleska University Lakota Studies department and was a featured performer in European tours in the 1990s

This free event is open to the public.

An Indian themed dinner will be provided.

To RSVP or for more information, call Miami University’s Regional Offices of Diversity & Multicultural Services at 513.785.3024 or email kinggm@miamioh.edu. Miami University Hamilton is located at 1601 University Blvd.

Fitton Center Program Explores Jerome Robbins

Join the Celebrating Self Series, 11:30 a.m. Wednesday, March 11, 2015 in the Carruthers Signature Ballroom at the Fitton Center for Creative Arts as Henry Cepluch, the Fitton Center’s Outreach Arts Director (Arts In Common) and Artistic Director of the Mad Anthony Theatre Company, presents “The Contribution of Jerome Robbins to the American Musical.”

Cepluch was an elementary teacher for 32 years before retiring and joining the Fitton Center staff. His involvement in theater spans more than 50 years as an actor and director. Henry is a frequent lecturer on theater for local clubs and the Institute for Learning in Retirement program at Miami University.

This presentation is part of the Celebrating Self Luncheon Series. Celebrating Self is a casual and informative luncheon series featuring regional speakers, interesting topics and delicious food served by a variety of caterers. The Carruthers Signature Ballroom opens at 11:30 a.m. with a buffet lunch and musical entertainment by Treva Boardman.

Celebrating Self is presented by Ohio Magazine, and the Celebrating Self Dessert Sponsor is Hillandale Family of Communities.

The cost is $15 for members and $20 for non-members.  For tickets please call 513-863-8873 ext. 110 or visit www.fittoncenter.org.

Local History from Jim Blount

Join local historian Jim Blount on Tuesday, March 10, 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. at the Hamilton Lane Library for a conversation about Hamilton in the Stagecoach Era: Myth and Reality.

No registration required. For details, call 894-7158. The Hamilton Lane Library is located at 300 N. Third St.

For more information about this and other programs at the Lane Libraries, please call

894-6557 or visit the Lane website at http://www.lanepl.org.